In all honesty, having Amazon (or any e-commerce site) send me marketing emails which draw my attention back to items I’ve already viewed to coax me to buy feels invasive and voyeuristic, and will make me less likely to purchase as a result. It’s a good technique, don’t get me wrong, and I can’t deny its effectiveness. But I’m the kind of customer who will steadfastly spend money when I decide to, and will respond to marketing techniques like the ones here by clamping down and withholding when I would otherwise make a purchase.
Other Business Idea

Dilution of Decision Making Ability-as-a-Service

When we use digital interruptions to ensure we’re never alone, we learn to only ask the kinds of questions the web can answer.
Spotify, Soundcloud, and the Open Web

Spotify and Soundcloud. Most of my music consumption takes place through these two services, and its an ongoing source of fascination to observe my patterns of usage.

Spotify is mostly used grudgingly. I pay for Spotify Pro, and I use the service when I have a very specific craving for one particular track or artist. But I also feel like I’m in someone else’s walled garden, being spoon-fed audio content. It leaves me feeling cut off and passive.

Soundcloud is constant consumption of musical edge cases. As I’ve said before to friends, I go there to hear music so strange it doesn’t have a name yet. When I put on a 2 hour set from a DJ/music producer on Soundcloud, it feels and sounds raw, experimental, in-progress. Its not infrequent to hear a DJ interacting with a crowd. Often I’m transported into a gathering of members of a particular subculture. I like to believe that navigating my way through these diverse patches of context and experience makes me a smarter person.

Spotify is a utility but Soundcloud is music consumption in line with the values of an open web. Just like the rest of the open web, I hope it stays that way.

humansofnewyork:

"There’s this giant cathedral in Cologne that survived the Allied bombings of World War II. All the other buildings around it were destroyed. One time I was super high on E and mushrooms, so I decide to drop in. The cathedral is made of black marble and the walls are stained with soot, so it was really creepy. On top of that, the place was packed with people, and there was a priest at the altar shouting angrily in German. I was like: ‘Oh. My. God.’"

humansofnewyork:

"There’s this giant cathedral in Cologne that survived the Allied bombings of World War II. All the other buildings around it were destroyed. One time I was super high on E and mushrooms, so I decide to drop in. The cathedral is made of black marble and the walls are stained with soot, so it was really creepy. On top of that, the place was packed with people, and there was a priest at the altar shouting angrily in German. I was like: ‘Oh. My. God.’"

I’ll admit

in certain respects I’m amused and confused when people talk about living in New York as a lifestyle that they’ve decided to take part in or opt out of. As someone who grew up here, its never been a lifestyle; its just been life.

Just remember

Just remember

humansofnewyork:

"They say it’s gonna snow tomorrow. Well I just got a bottle of whiskey. So let it fucking snow."

humansofnewyork:

"They say it’s gonna snow tomorrow. Well I just got a bottle of whiskey. So let it fucking snow."

newspeedwayboogie:

basically, this was the end of the road. Sad times.
gratefuldeadnotes:

dark times. 

'And when you hear somebody say “Fuck you, we'll do what we want,” remember something.
That applies to us, too.’

one of the finest displays of community management I’ve ever seen

newspeedwayboogie:

basically, this was the end of the road. Sad times.

gratefuldeadnotes:

dark times. 

'And when you hear somebody say “Fuck you, we'll do what we want,” remember something.

That applies to us, too.’

one of the finest displays of community management I’ve ever seen

(Source: grateful4dead)